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In Case You Missed: JAK Inhibitors in the Management of Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis

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Atopic dermatitis (AD) affects up to 30% of children and 5% of adults. Although 70% of patients have mild disease, which can be treated with basic skincare management and topical agents, 30% have moderate to severe AD, which is substantially more difficult to treat. Until recently, systemic steroids were the only treatment option for these patients, but they have limited efficacy with a poor safety profile. The recent advent and availability of non-steroidal systemic treatment options revolutionized the management of moderate to severe AD, not only providing significant improvement in clinical outcomes, but also heralding a new era in drug development for AD. In addition to biologics, oral therapies that target a variety of signaling molecules (eg, PDE4, Janus Kinase [JAK], prostaglandin receptors) are also emerging. As data continue to emerge on new agents, head-to-head comparative study results on JAK inhibitors are becoming available, further elucidating their role in the treatment algorithm for moderate to severe AD. In this educational activity, expert faculty in the field of AD explore the most recent clinical data for available and emerging JAK inhibitors and assess new evidence regarding the use of these agents as monotherapy and combination therapy, as compared to other therapies with different mechanisms of action.

Webcasts

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In Case You Missed: JAK Inhibitors in the Management of Moderate to Severe Atopic Dermatitis
Faculty: Anthony Fernandez, MD, PhD; Andrew Blauvelt, MD; Amy Paller, MD
Release date: May 31, 2022
Expiration date: May 31, 2023
Estimated Time: 1 hour
Type:  Webcast
Technical Requirements: None
Specialty: allergy, immunology, dermatology

Learning Objectives

Upon successful completion of the activities, participants should be better able to:

  • Examine the latest clinical safety and efficacy data for available and emerging JAK inhibitors in the management of patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis.

  • Assess new evidence regarding the use of JAK inhibitors as monotherapy or combination therapy for the treatment of moderate to severe atopic dermatitis, in general, and compared to other therapies with different mechanisms of action.

Target Audience

These activities are directed to allergists, dermatologists, and other health care professionals (nurses, physician assistants, pharmacists) involved in the management of patients with moderate to severe atopic dermatitis.

Activity Director

Anthony P. Fernandez, MD, PhD
Director of Medical Dermatology
Department of Dermatology
Dermatology and Plastic Surgery Institute
Cleveland Clinic

This CME activity was produced by Cleveland Clinic's Center for Continuing Education and Vindico Education.